What to Do About Corporate Whinging – What Venting and Blaming is Really About!

Your team member falls into your office.  They are emotional.  Something has happened and they need to get it off their chest.  You know that you just need to give them the opportunity to vent.

During that venting process, there is a lot of blaming, regret, frustration…but at least they are getting it off their chest.  You look at your watch, an hour has passed, no sign of letting up, and you are feeling like crap now…the negative energy is contagious.

So here’s the thing…venting is not useful.

Yes, we have been taught that it is necessary and of value, but my belief is that it serves no useful purpose.

  1. It wastes valuable time that could be focused on moving to a solution or resolution – like when you stuff around getting ready to go somewhere, then are late and miss it anyway, so why did you bother – nothing gained.
  2. It reinforces the issues by going over and over them – like a child over-doing the colouring in to the point where the paper tears
  3. It reinforces and extends the emotional experience associated with the issue – by keeping it alive, even taking it to new levels of negativity – like when you use a magnifying glass to use the sun to set an ant on fire (no I never did that – someone told me about it).

So why do vent?

  1. It feels good.  It feels like problem-solving.  But it’s not.
  2. It alleviates stress and tension in the moment, but not long term.
  3. An inevitable sympathetic response makes you feel better, like you are not alone.

I believe there are two things that are really happening here.  Firstly, the ventor is avoiding the effort and accountability associated with owning the situation and owning progression to a solution i.e., they want to pass the buck.  But most importantly…

‘People vent, whinge and blame because they haven’t felt heard!’

If you have a team of ventors, or whingers, or blamers…begin with taking the time to let them feel heard.  Here are three steps you can take to help them feel heard and then redirect their energy to more useful places.

  1. Validate what they are saying, but ‘shrink wrap’ it into factual, manageable chunks – ‘So what you are saying is that John didn’t deliver for the third week in a row’
  2. Focus on their emotion, not the content – ‘I can see that you are disappointed in this outcome.’
  3. Redirect their focus – ‘So what is it you need to do to move beyond this…’ or ‘So what is the thinking you need to do, or action you now need to take so this situation changes?

You will find your own language around this, just follow the general approach.

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